Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Neuropathol Appl Neurobiol. 2009 Jun;35(3):329-337. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2990.2008.01003a.x.

pH measurement as quality control on human post mortem brain tissue: a study of the BrainNet Europe consortium.

Author information

1
Department of Neuropathology, Institute of Pathology, Würzburg.
2
Clinical Neurochemistry (National Parkinson Foundation Centre of Excellence Research Laboratory), Clinic and Policlinic for Psychiatry, Psychosomatic and Psychotherapy, University of Würzburg, Würzburg.
3
Department of Clinical Medicine, Kuopio University, Kuopio, Finland.
4
Institut de Neuropatologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
5
Department of Clinical Neuropathology, London Institute of Psychiatry, London, UK.
6
Institute of Neuropathology, University Hospital, Münster.
7
Clinic of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Georg-August-University, Göttingen.
8
Institute of Brain Research Neuropathology, Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany.
9
Prince of Wales Medical Research Institute and University of New South Wales, Sydney.
10
Department of Pathology, University of Sydney, Syndney.
11
Department of Anatomical Pathology, Monash University, The Alfred Hospital, Prahran, Victoria, Australia.
#
Contributed equally

Abstract

AIMS:

Most brain diseases are complex entities. Although animal models or cell culture experiments mimic some disease aspects, human post mortem brain tissue remains essential to advance our understanding of brain diseases using biochemical and molecular techniques. Post mortem artefacts must be properly understood, standardized, and either eliminated or factored into such experiments. Here we examine the influence of several premortem and post mortem factors on pH, and discuss the role of pH as a biochemical marker for brain tissue quality.

METHODS:

We assessed brain tissue pH in 339 samples from 116 brains provided by 8 different European and 2 Australian brain bank centres. We correlated brain pH with tissue source, post mortem delay, age, gender, freezing method, storage duration, agonal state and brain ischaemia.

RESULTS:

Our results revealed that only prolonged agonal state and ischaemic brain damage influenced brain tissue pH next to repeated freeze/thaw cycles.

CONCLUSIONS:

pH measurement in brain tissue is a good indicator of premortem events in brain tissue and it signals limitations for post mortem investigations.

PMID:
19473297
PMCID:
PMC4532399
DOI:
10.1111/j.1365-2990.2008.01003a.x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
женский возбудитель в каплях

http://swiss-apo.com